Walk (Drive) A Mile In His Shoes

Sometimes I get a text or a call from my trucker-hubby as he’s about to drive by home with a load (of cattle) with the invite to come along for a ride. I never give up the chance even if it’s an overnighter. We’re especially fortunate now to have son Tyler fully trained to pick up the reigns and tackle those chores in our absence. We took advantage of him last weekend so that I could accompany hubby on a trip to the south of the province which would be an overnight stay in the Kenworth.

What I came away with was a renewed appreciation of what he puts up with on the road (wild winter weather/rude & impatient drivers-all for another post maybe) how different and limiting the environment is for truckers in the world of COVID restrictions.

On the upside…the traffic is definitely lighter. We would go for an hour almost sometimes and not meet an oncoming vehicle….that’s definitely a benefit.

But the real downside is the lack of rest stops and services for them when they do finally end the day and have time to rest and restore.

We went as far as Picture Butte (5 hours from home) and after he had delivered his load…in the dark….all alone (no employees to help with unloading at the feed lots after 5PM anymore) we camped out at a co-op gas bar/truck stop which thankfully provides a clean washroom/shower building but that’s it. From there we took a chilly “romantic” walk through the industrial area to downtown to find a place to eat.

That’s us…with the purty lights!

But that’s the thing….no dining in any restaurants right now under Public Health Orders so a tired trucker has to find an establishment that offers takeout and he/she waits out on the street until it’s ready and takes it back to the truck to eat alone. The hospitality and congeniality they used to find in these places has been taken away from them and it makes for a very, very long day.

So we ordered some donairs for takeout – waited out on the street – then found a picnic table in the dark beside the Scotiabank and ate our supper before walking back to the truck again – back through the dark and empty streets.

Too dark at the picnic table for our selfie-thanks for providing our dining “room” Scotiabank!

He wanted to point out to me too that in Picture Butte back in the day, after he and other truckers in his group had finished their loads at respective feed lots, they would meet at a particular pub for last call. The last trucker in would get the bill. It used to be hopping busy and a good place to unwind, but now…..ghostly silent, one vehicle outside waiting for a takeout order.

This turned out to be a longer post than I usually publish because I guess I wanted to share a message with a little background. You’ve heard it before but I hope you will – “Thank A Trucker”….

or

maybe just pack a supply of emergency face masks to give to the poor trucker that’s refused entry or service to the only convenience store around just because he/she might have forgotten his/her mask back in the truck at the far-far end of the parking lot…..because – oh yes….that happens.

just …. “Thank A Trucker”

4 thoughts on “Walk (Drive) A Mile In His Shoes

  1. A really interesting look at life in small town truck stops. The only experience we’ve had with truck stops is at the big ones on the Interstate between the Alberta border and Phoenix AZ. Excellent facilities and easy access to food – if you don’t mind fast food. We drove from Phoenix to Calgary in late April and were almost the only passenger vehicle on the road – but lots of truckers! It was just about the easiest drive we’ve ever had.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hubby only trucks in Alberta where restrictions are in place. I have a feeling the American states will be pressured to make a few more restrictions part of life soon now too…..we shall see, eh?

      Like

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